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Consolidation of the Republic (1792-1849)

Page history last edited by Sheridan Hay 15 years, 5 months ago

Unit Two:  The Consolidation of the Republic (1792-1849)

 

As the nation grows, a number of issues and challenges test the character and values upon which this new country will evolve. The nation would have to determine which citizens would be included in the task of governing this fledgling republic. Competing visions for the country would be the source of vigorous debate across the land. The Constitution would prove to be a document that was not simply frozen in time, but subject to lively debate as the needs of a growing country would test its applicability and relevance in the light of changing realities. Over the course of fifty years, the country would more than double in size. Debate as to how this new territory would be admitted into the Union would be a precursor to a debate on the very survival of an intact Union. Political compromises would be fashioned to deal with these challenges, but would ultimately prove to be an unsatisfactory response to the issue of slavery. The settlement of this new land would test American policy and ethics regarding the treatment of Aboriginal peoples. America would fight its first major war with her neighbour to the North in an attempt to become the pre-eminent North American power. The expansion of American influence in the hemisphere is aided with two concepts, the Monroe Doctrine and Manifest Destiny. Women force their way into the Body Politic with the convening of the Seneca Falls Convention that would challenge long held beliefs and prejudices.

 

Throughout this unit we will use a variety of primary source documents to develop the skills necessary to historians. Through the sequence of activities, we will familiarize ourselves with different perspectives on questions. You are encouraged to read widely, think critically, and come to an understanding of the complexity of the issues presented in this unit.

 

Culminating Activity:  Short Position Paper

A short paper of no more that 300 words will be assigned, asking you to take a position on an issue of some historical debate. You will articulate your position defending one perspective over the other in a formal thesis style format. You are asked to use corroborating points from both the primary source documents to be analysed and their textbook. Possible issues could include: Jefferson vs. Hamilton on the issue of a National Bank; Jefferson’s dislike of party politics as chronicled in the election of 1800; Urbanization versus Agrarian democracy as a vision for the country; the inclusiveness of women in the political process as highlighted by the Seneca Falls Convention.

 

MARCH - U.S. HISTORY

 

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American-History

 

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